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Report: Partying, nude swimming led to firing of Navy commodore

When Capt. David Geisler was fired as a commodore in the 5th Fleet headquartered in Bahrain late last year, the Navy would only say that there was a "loss of confidence" in his ability to command and that an investigation into "alleged inappropriate conduct" was continuing.

As it turns out, according to a report in the Navy Times, the commanding officer nicknamed “Hoss” was at the center of hard-partying band of officers and enlisted service members in Bahrain whose debauchery got out of hand one night last June after a full day of drinking at a waterway apartment complex called the Floating City.


At a patio party visible to other residents on both sides of the canal, the host, reportedly a junior officer, took off her bikini top, which kicked the party up a notch. That led another woman to remove her top and a man to take off his pants. The three then went skinny dipping in the waters off the complex, according to the report.

That’s when Geisler, the highest ranking officer at the off-station party, become more involved, the Navy Times reported:

Capt. David Geisler, commodore of the logistics task force responsible for supplying all naval assets in 5th Fleet, who had spent the afternoon drinking and floating in an inner tube on the canal, removed his bathing suit and swam nude, witnesses said.

His participation in this and other such parties would lead to his firing later in the year, according to an investigation into his and others’ behavior in Bahrain.

Neighbors, and other officers complained, saying such behavior was counter to the prevailing culture in an Islamic country where women wear headscarves and public displays of affection are rare.

The Navy Times published details of the investigation into Geisler’s firing on Sunday after receiving the report through a Freedom of Information Act request.

Tales of the officer's escapades – which also included a Toga party and Lingerie party – moved through the ranks and created a morale problem among the enlisted members and those outside the "in-crowd," according to the Navy Times.

In an move to cut down on excessive drinking in the Navy, Secretary Ray Maybus announced a major health initiative last month that includes breathalyzer tests for sailors reporting for duty aboard ships, submarines and squadrons.

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