Discuss as:

Zimmerman recounts shooting Martin in vivid detail

According to George Zimmerman, he lost track of Trayvon Martin and was walking back to his vehicle when the two crossed paths at which point Martin reportedly attacked him. NBC's Kerry Sanders reports.

 

George Zimmerman, the man charged with killing Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, told police he took his "gun, aimed it at him, and fired one shot" after Martin allegedly threw repeated punches at him, according to police video made public Thursday.

Varying accounts of what happened between Zimmerman, 28, and Martin, 17, inside the gated community in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 26 have trickled out to the public via state prosecutors, lawyers and relatives. But on Thursday morning, Zimmerman's defense team released a trove of information gathered in the initial days of the investigation that includes a never-heard police interview with Zimmerman and a video re-enactment of the shooting.

 The one hour, 11-minute videotaped police interview was conducted almost exactly 24 hours after the single gunshot fired by Zimmerman pierced Martin's chest. Police used the interview to perform a computerized voice stress analysis, which detects psychological stress based on voice patterns, on Zimmerman.

Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, had called police to report a suspicious person when he spotted Martin. In the videotape, he walked officials through what happened next as he approached Martin.

"I reached for my pocket, and I was looking for my phone, and he just punched me in the nose. And I fell backwards, to the side, somehow I ended up on my back. He ended up on top of me and he just kept punching my face and my head," Zimmerman said, adding that he was "screaming for help" as Martin allegedly pummeled him.

NBC's Kerry Sanders and NBC's James Novogrod reported from Sanford, Fla. Elizabeth Chuck is a reporter for msnbc.com. Follow Kerry Sanders on Twitter here, James Novogrod on Twitter here, and Elizabeth Chuck on Twitter here.

"He told me, 'Shut the f*** up.' I kept yelling for help," Zimmerman told police.

Zimmerman said Martin "took my head and slammed it into the concrete several times."

As they fought, Zimmerman said, his jacket and shirt rose up, revealing his gun. Martin then said, "You're going to die tonight," according to Zimmerman.

Martin then allegedly slid his hand down Zimmerman's chest, so "I just pinched his arm and I grabbed my gun and I aimed it at him and fired one shot. He kind of sat back and said, 'You got me here,' 'You got me,' 'You got it,' something like that. And I thought he was saying that he heard the shot and that he was giving up."

But Martin had actually been hit by the gunshot, and died a short time later. An autopsy report confirmed he had been shot at "intermediate range," and also found a small abrasion on his left ring finger, below the knuckle.

A source told NBC News that Zimmerman passed the voice stress test, but that the results may not be admissible in court. A Sanford police spokeswoman said police would not comment on the results of Zimmerman’s stress test, as the case was still ongoing. 

Video of Zimmerman re-enacting the events released
In the video re-enactment of the altercation, Zimmerman takes investigators to the area where he first spotted Martin.

Zimmerman said he was driving when he first passed by Martin, who he saw "leisurely looking" at a home that had been robbed before in the Retreat at Twin Lakes apartment community. It was raining, and Zimmerman said he didn't understand why Martin wasn't rushing to get inside. "I just felt like something was off about him," he said.

In a video clip from Feb. 27, 2012, released by his attorney, George Zimmerman takes investigators back to the scene of his shooting of Trayvon Martin. (George Zimmerman featured at 2:15)

Zimmerman called the Sanford police non-emergency line. He said he lost sight of Martin and was instructed to "get to somewhere where you can see him." He tailed him around the block and then Martin saw him and circled around his car a few times, he said.

Trayvon Martin killed by single gunshot fired from 'intermediate range,' autopsy shows 

Key events in the Trayvon Martin case 

4 months after Trayvon Martin shooting, Sanford police chief fired

Still on the phone with non-emergency officials, Zimmerman said he got out of his vehicle to try to find a street address for them. When the dispatcher told Zimmerman that officers didn't need him to follow Martin, Zimmerman allegedly started walking back to his car, where he planned to meet the responding officer.

"When I got to right about here," Zimmerman said on the re-enactment video, pointing to a spot on the sidewalk, "He [Martin] yelled from behind of me, to the side of me, he said, 'Yo, you got a problem?' And I turned around and I said, 'No, I don't have a problem, man.'"

Martin walked toward him, said "Well, you got a problem now," and began the scuffle that preceded the deadly gunshot at that time, Zimmerman said.

Police found Martin dead on the sidewalk face down, unarmed. He had Skittles and an iced tea that he had purchased from a convenience store, and was dressed in a hoodie as he made his way back to his father's girlfriend's house in the apartment community on the drizzly night.

Zimmerman claimed he shot Martin in self-defense. Zimmerman was treated at the scene for cuts and a bloody nose, and then questioned before police released him hours later without an arrest, believing there wasn't any evidence to challenge his account.

Authorities said Zimmerman's conduct appeared to be justified under Florida's Stand Your Ground law. But questions began to arise about whether there had been a racial motivation in the case, prompting protests in Florida and nationwide: Martin was black; Zimmerman's father is white and his mother is Hispanic. A special prosecutor took over the case, and Zimmerman was charged with second-degree murder on April 11.

Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to the charge. He remains in a solitary cell in Florida's Seminole County jail.

The re-enactment begins in investigators' car. Zimmerman said he was driving when he first passed by Martin, who he saw "leisurely looking" at a home that had been robbed before in the Retreat at Twin Lakes gated apartment community. It was raining, and Zimmerman said he didn't understand why Martin wasn't rushing to get inside. "I just felt like something was off about him," he said.

Zimmerman called the Sanford police non-emergency line. He said he lost sight of Martin and was instructed to "get to somewhere where you can see him." He tailed him around the block and then Martin saw him and circled his car a few times, he said.

Still on the phone with non-emergency officials, Zimmerman said he got out of his vehicle to try to find a street address. When the dispatcher told Zimmerman that officers didn't need him to follow Martin, Zimmerman allegedly started walking back to his car, where he planned to meet the responding officer.

"When I got to right about here," Zimmerman said on the re-enactment video, pointing to a spot on the sidewalk, "He [Martin] yelled from behind of me, to the side of me, he said, 'Yo, you got a problem?' And I turned around and I said, 'No, I don't have a problem, man.'"

Police found Martin dead on the sidewalk face down, unarmed. He had Skittles and an iced tea that he had purchased from a convenience store, and was dressed in a hoodie as he made his way back to his father's girlfriend's house in the apartment community on the drizzly night.

Zimmerman claimed he shot Martin in self-defense. Zimmerman was treated at the scene for cuts and a bloody nose, and then questioned before police released him hours later without an arrest, believing there wasn't any evidence to challenge his account.

Authorities said Zimmerman's conduct appeared to be justified under Florida's Stand Your Ground law. But questions began to arise about whether there had been a racial motivation in the case, prompting protests in Florida and nationwide: Martin was black; Zimmerman's father is white and his mother is Hispanic. A special prosecutor took over the case, and Zimmerman was charged with second-degree murder on April 11.

Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to the charge. He remains in a solitary cell in Florida's Seminole County jail.

More content from msnbc.com and NBC News:

Follow US News on msnbc.com on Twitter and Facebook