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Iraqi who helped U.S. soldiers charged with sexual assault in Colorado

Colorado Springs Police Department

Jasim Mohammed Hassin Ramadon served as an Iraqi informant for U.S. soldiers in 2003. He was recently charged with sexual assault in Colorado.

As a boy, Jasim Mohammed Hassin Ramadon was praised for his courage in serving as an informant to U.S. soldiers in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq in 2003.

But Ramadon, who was eventually relocated to the U.S. with the assistance of the soldiers he helped, is now charged with a brutal sexual assault.

In an affidavit obtained by NBC News, Ramadon, 22, is identified as one of five Iraqi men who allegedly participated in the July 23 attack on a woman in Colorado Springs, Colo. Both Ramadon and Sarmad Fadhi Mohammed are charged with sexual assault and accessory; the other three men have been charged with accessory.


The affidavit states that the victim returned to her apartment after midnight after working a night shift. She then went to check her mail and encountered a group of young men arguing. She intervened to stop the altercation and spoke to some of the men once the fight broke up. She next recalled being in an apartment with four of the men and discussing their unhappiness at how they were treated in the U.S. and the difficulty of living in a foreign country. 

"(She) further said the males talked about the United States oppressing them and calling them terrorists," read the affidavit. "(She) explained the four males reminded her of her son and she wanted to help calm them down."

The woman recalled drinking what she believed was lemonade and said she had no memory of the events that followed until waking up in her apartment later that morning in "immense" pain. When a police officer was dispatched to her apartment that morning, she noticed "numerous apparent blood stains inside and outside the apartment," the affidavit said.

The Colorado Springs Police Department said in a statement that, "An examination at the hospital revealed significant internal injuries consistent with blunt force trauma and serious bodily injuries, rarely seen."

In 2009, Ramadon told Colorado Springs NBC affiliate KOAA about his time as an informant to U.S. soldiers and the difficulty of adjusting to life in America.

Ramadon's father was a captain in the Iraqi army, according to KOAA. Ramadon, then 13 years old, rejected his father's instructions to kill U.S. troops and instead assisted soldiers in capturing his father during a night raid. He eventually participated in 20 missions, turning over 40 insurgents. Ramadon's mother, though, was shot to death in front of his family.

Ramadon's story was featured in the 2009 memoir, "A Soldier's Promise," by Army First Sgt. Daniel Hendrex. He was relocated to Colorado Springs and lived temporarily with Hendrex, who had promised to care for Ramadon.

"But after eight months, it became clear that we were not going to be the best long-term care option for him," Hendrex wrote in his memoir. "He has so much potential, but (Ramadon) needs a great deal of guidance to help him deal with his tumultuous past."

On the advice of a child psychologist, Hendrex parted ways with Ramadon with the hope that it might help the teenager start anew: "I was too close and too much a part of some of the most traumatic incidents of his life in Iraq," he wrote.

Ramadon was placed in foster care, and KOAA reported that he struggled with untreated post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. He told the station that he had trouble acclimating at school and that his classmates called him a "terrorist." Despite those troubles, Ramadon married and had a daughter.

Ramadon was arrested on sexual assault charges on Tuesday. He is being held on $250,000 bond, according to the Associated Press.

Others arrested in the case also were being held on $250,000 bond. Court records indicate Ramadon has a public attorney, the AP reported. It was not known if the other suspects had legal representation. The suspects have not entered a plea; a preliminary hearing will be held on Sept. 4.

All of the suspects have lawful permanent resident status in the U.S., but the Colorado Springs Police Department said in a statement that they can be deported if they are convicted of committing a felony sexual assault.

Rebecca Ruiz is a reporter at NBC News. Follow her on Twitter here.

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