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Hair stylists fight in court over $9.5 million lotto jackpot

Seven hair dressers from Indianapolis have taken a coworker to court claiming she cheated them out of their share of a $9.5 million Hoosier Lotto jackpot.


For her part, the woman claims it was her ticket that won, not an office pool ticket, so she wants to keep all of the winnings.

Marion County Superior Court Judge Heather A. Welch heard testimony on Wednesday and said she would rule on the case by the end of the week, the Indianapolis Star reported.

According to NBC station WTHR-TV, eight stylists who work at a local salon pooled their money to buy lottery tickets for the Feb. 16 drawing.

One of the women, identified by the Indianapolis star as Christina Shaw, was sent out to buy the tickets at a local gas station, but also apparently bought tickets for herself.

Shaw then discovered she'd won, but before making the trek to the Hoosier Lottery headquarters to claim her jackpot, stopped by the hair salon to inform her fellow stylists that her ticket had won, not theirs.

The coworkers called attorney Scott Montross who filed a restraining order to freeze the money. The court action, Montross said, was not against Shaw herself but only to keep the jackpot from being paid out.

“We are concerned that the winning ticket may have been purchased with the group’s money," Montross earlier told the Star. "There’s a dispute about it, but until there is something more definitive, we were trying to keep a low profile. But we needed to slow the train down."

Montross, the Star reported, said the coworkers at Lou’s Creative Styles routinely each contributed $5 each for lottery tickets, and that they agreed that whoever bought the tickets for the group couldn’t buy tickets for themselves in the same place.

Shaw did not comment on the case, though she did indicate to the Star that she had hired an attorney.

A Marion County judge decided to place a hold on the winnings, which after hearing from both sides on Wednesday, she extended until Friday.

According to the Star, the coworkers filing the case were identified as: Lucy Lewis-Johnston, Melanie Ann Bonar; Margie Day-Braugh; Judith Kay Pallatin; Patricia L. Pohlman; Linda Sue Stewart; and Edna M. Thomas.

A voice message left for Montross by NBC News wasn’t immediately returned.