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It's 'nice to do something good': Kids raise money for family of boy killed in Boston Marathon bombing

Kerry Sanders / NBC News

Four girls set up a lemonade and baked goods stand to raise money for the family of Martin Richard, who was killed in the Boston Marathon bombing.

SQUANTUM,  Mass. --  In the shadow of downtown Boston, four best friends, all 10 years old, decided to replace anguish with action.

In this tiny seaside community of about 400 families, four girls, set up a lemonade and baked goods stand near the Kennedy Library Thursday.

Brigid Norris didn't know 8-year-old bombing victim Martin Richard, but she knew she wanted to help.

"We hoped to raise $100, and so far we've raised more than $3,000."

Richard, 8, was standing by the finish line at the Boston Marathon with his family Monday afternoon when an explosion tore through the area, killing him and two others, and injuring 176. Richard's mother, Denise, suffered a brain injury and his 6-year-old sister reportedly lost a leg.

The girls -- their money piling up in a toy cash register -- say they're astonished.


"We've had, like, five people give us $100 and not even take a cookie," said a smiling red-headed Norris.

Kerry Sanders / NBC News

Four girls set up a lemonade and baked goods stand to raise money for the family of Martin Richard, who was killed in the Boston Marathon bombing.

The girls said they'll give the money they raise to the Richard family.

It was all Ciara O'Connors's idea.

"If this happened to my family, I would want somebody to help me out, too,” she said.

Excited and happy, Mary Loney said: "We were up past midnight baking brownies and making signs."

Says 10-year-old Lauren Manning: "It's just nice to do something good."

Watching over the girls and their stand is one of the girls' mothers, Trisha Loney.

“They saw Martin Richard's picture and I think they just saw it was just like all their little friends,” she said, adding, “They can relate.”

Tina Dellorfano stopped to buy some cookies and told the kids: "You're doing a good thing."

"Boston has Fourth of July and the Marathon, that's our Christmas,” said Dellorfano.

Small moments of brightness, she said, "may be the things we remember next year and not the bombing."

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